Exploring Gallipoli and Remembering the ANZACs

As the sun rises over Anzac Cove in Gallipoli on the 25th April this year, Australia and New Zealand will remember this day, one hundred years ago, when the Anzacs, the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps, landed at Gallipoli.

Exploring Gallipoli and Remembering the ANZACs

Lest we forget

 

Remembering Anzac Day

Many Australians visit Turkey and many make the pilgrimage to Gallipoli to Remember Anzac Day. Is this because of our sense of duty or is it because as we get older, we realise that the history of our country is important? For me it was a mix of both.

As schoolchildren, Anzac Day was important to us for one reason…a day we didn’t have to go to school! We knew the history but we could not relate to it.

As we got older we may have attended an Anzac Day service in our home town. In the last few years there’s definitely been an increase in the number of people attending Anzac Day services, especially amongst the younger generation.

As we travelled……
In 2013, we attended the Anzac Day Dawn Service at Villers-Brettoneux. With the sun slowly rising over the war memorial, the sound of the lone piper and the speeches citing excerpts of letters from those in the trenches, a scene was set that we had never imagined.

Exploring Gallipoli and Remembering the ANZACs

The sun rises at Villers-Bretonneux

 

A day spent driving around the beautiful Somme area, the hills dotted with thousands of white crosses and war memorials recording the many names of those who lost their lives, very quickly made us realise exactly the price that was paid by so many young men.

Exploring Gallipoli and Remembering the ANZACs

Cemeteries dot the Somme landscape in France

 

 

Centenary celebrations for Anzac Day actually started last year. On Nov 1st 1914, troop ships carrying Australia’s soldiers left Albany in Western Australia for Europe. Visiting this memorial and reading comments from those who were on the boats added to the realism of the situation.

With all of this, we felt that the time had come to finally visit Gallipoli.
Our ferry from Greece took us to Kusadasi and from there we drove via Ephesus and Alaçati to Canakkale and finally by ferry to Eceabat.

 

Exploring Gallipoli and Remembering the ANZACs

Signs point the way to Gallipoli in Eceabat

 

We had not arranged a guide to tour the battlefields of Gallipoli but by coincidence there was a tour group meeting at our first stop. I chatted to the tour leader, asking which company he was from. In my years as a travel agent we had used a specific Turkish/Australian tour guide for clients who wanted to visit Gallipoli. He was from the same company we used but you can imagine my surprise when he told me his name. He was the owner of the company that we had always dealt with. What a coincidence….it was like meeting a long lost friend! We then joined his tour of the area which gave us a far greater insight to the history that we would otherwise have had.

 

Highlights of Gallipoli

Beach Cemetery

Exploring Gallipoli and Remembering the ANZACs

A red flower marks Simpson’s Grave at Beach CemeteryExploring Gallipoli in Remembrance of the ANZACs

 

This cemetery marks the southern end of Anzac Cove and a point known as Hell Spit. The most famous grave here is that of John Simpson Kilpatrick of ‘Simpson and his donkey‘ fame

Private John Simpson Kilpatrick was killed by shrapnel on May 19 aged 22 years. He had been in Gallipoli for only 25 days but in that time he and his donkey had carried 202 wounded men back to the medical stations.

Not far from here, a path leads you to Shrapnel Valley and onto Monash Valley. Shrapnel Valley was the main route that the troops took to get to from the beach to the frontline. Once the Turks realised this it became a dangerous path to take. It was along these paths that Simpson and his donkey carried many wounded. It was also here that he met his death.

 

Anzac Cove

Exploring Gallipoli and Remembering the ANZACs

Anzac Cove

 

The site of the first landing of the Anzac troops on 25th April 1915 is marked by a solitary wall bearing the words Anzac Koyu/ Anzac Cove. Here twelve hundred soldiers from the 9th, 10th and 11th Battalions of the 3rd Australian Infantry Brigade were first ashore. Unfortunately they were supposed to have been a kilometre and a half further south but the boats lost their way in the dark. They were met with heavy gunfire from the Turkish.

Exploring Gallipoli and Remembering the ANZACs

Anzac Cove now and in 1915

 

Our guide had a photo of how the beach looked at this time which we compared to now. 100 years ago the beach was 600 metres long and 20 metres wide but erosion has now reduced it by 30-40 metres.

 

Exploring Gallipoli and Remembering the ANZACs

Anzac Cove Beach

 

Kabatepe Ari Burnu Beach Memorial

Those heroes that shed their blood, and lost their lives …
You are now lying in the soil of a friendly country.
Therefore, rest in peace.
There is no difference between the Johnnies
And the Mehmets to us where they lie side by side,
Here in this country of ours.
You, the mothers, who sent their sons from far away countries …
Wipe away your tears.
Your sons are now lying in our bosom and are in peace.
After having lost their lives on this land, they have
Become our sons as well.

These poignant words, written by Mehet Kemel Ataturk in 1934, were sent to the first officials of the Allied Forces to visit Gallipoli after the First World War. The memorial on which they are written is close to the sight of the first Gallipoli landing on April 25th 1915…

Exploring Gallipoli and Remembering the ANZACs

Ataturk’s memorial at Ari Burnu

 

 

Ari Burnu Cemetery

At the northern end of Anzac Cove is Ari Burnu (Bee Point) Cemetery. On that fateful day, troops landed all along this stretch of water and faced the task of trying to head to Chunuk Bair, the highest point near here.

Many met their death here and are buried in the cemetery where two large oak trees, symbols of long life, stand majestically over the graves.

Exploring Gallipoli and Remembering the ANZACs

Ari Burnu cemetery

 

I went down and stood on the beach, thinking of those who were on of the first boats to come ashore. According to Charles Bean, Australia’s war correspondent at the time, they quickly realised they were in the wrong place but had to proceed up the beach. A call to retreat was requested a few days after the landing but was denied. The rest is history.

Exploring Gallipoli and Remembering the ANZACs

The beach at Ari Burnu

 

Anzac Commemorative Site

Exploring Gallipoli and Remembering the ANZACs

The Anzac Commemorative Site

 

The commemorative site was moved to this position on North Beach in 2001 so more people could be accommodated for the dawn service. This year it will see the most people it has ever seen with 10,500 people attending the dawn service.

Exploring Gallipoli and Remembering the ANZACs

The wall in front of the white car in the picture has display panels telling the Anzac Day story.

 

If you stand with your back to the sea, you can see one of three high ridges that faced the soldiers. Having come from training camps in Egypt, they quickly nicknamed this ridge the Sphinx…a perfect named as you can see!

Exploring Gallipoli and Remembering the ANZACs

 

 

Turkish Soldier

Exploring Gallipoli and Remembering the ANZACs

The statue of a Turkish soldier carrying an ANZAC soldier

 

On the road to Lone Pine, you will pass a statue that depicts a turkish soldier carrying and Anzac soldier.

The scene is supposedly inspired by a story told by Lord Casey, who was once Australia’s Governor General. The story tells the tale of the Turkish soldier raising a white flag and then getting out of the trench and carrying the injured Anzac soldier to the Allied trenches. This has not been confirmed and there are many variations of the story told but the gesture is memorable.

 

Lone Pine Memorial

Exploring Gallipoli and Remembering the ANZACs

Lone Pine Memorial

 

Lone Pine is the site of the Australian War Memorial. Australian Anzac Day memorial services take place here each year. It is one of the memorials that Australians visiting Gallipoli ensure they visit.

Over three days in August, in a very small area and with opposing trenches only metres away from each other, 2000 Allied soldiers and 7000 Turkish soldiers lost their lives. Seven Victoria Crosses were award to our soldiers at this, one of the hardest battles of the war.

Exploring Gallipoli and Remembering the ANZACs

The trenches at Lone Pine

 

The lone pine tree that stands here today was grown from seed after the original was destroyed early on in the battle and its replacement was burnt in a fire. The story tells of a soldier who found a pine cone on his dead brother and sent the cone back to his mother as a memento. Seeds were taken for this cone for a pine tree in Canberra and Albany and for the replacement tree in Turkey.

It was here that I found the headstone for 16 year old Private O’Donnell who had runaway to join the army. So young.

Exploring Gallipoli and Remembering the ANZACs

The grave of a sixteen year old soldier

 

Alay Turkish Cemetery.

Exploring Gallipoli and Remembering the ANZACs

Alay Turkish Cemetery

 

We also stopped at this Turkish cemetery that remembers the Turkish 57th regiment, led by Mustafa Kemel (Ataturk)

The 57th regiment were fighting at Chunuk Bair when Ataturk gave his famous order:

“I am not ordering you to attack, I am ordering you to die. In the time if takes us to die, other troops and commanders will arrive to take our places”.

 

Chunuk Bair Memorial

Exploring Gallipoli and Remembering the ANZACs

The hills of Sari Bair that the troops had to overcome to reach Chunuk Bair

 

One of the first objectives for the ANZAC troops when they landed at Gallipoli was to take control of Chunuk Bair, a high point overlooking Gallipoli.

New Zealand lost many troops in one of the most ferocious battles of the war.  Approximately 30,000 troops died here over a period of 4 days in August 1915 and it is here that the New Zealand war memorial remembers those who died.

Exploring Gallipoli and Remembering the ANZACs

The New Zealand Memorial

 

Exploring Gallipoli and Remembering the ANZACs

The trenches at Chunuk Bair

 

Exploring Gallipoli and Remembering the ANZACs

 

It is also the site of a statue of Mustafa Kemel Ataturk.

Exploring Gallipoli and Remembering the ANZACs

The statue of Atatuk

 

Ataturk gave his famous order here as the first wave of the Anzac troops made their way to the point on April 25th.  Turkish leaders did not believe that the allies would traverse the steep slopes surrounding this point but Ataturk did and organised for his troops to be waiting.

 

Brighton Beach

Exploring Gallipoli and Remembering the ANZACs

Brighton Beach where the troops should have landed

 

From here we headed back to Brighton Beach, our starting point of the tour and the beach where the ANZACs were supposed to have landed.

I wonder how history would read if they had been on course and landed here instead of Anzac Cove.

 

Information:
TJ Tours
Contact TJ at [email protected]
Anzac Gallipoli Tours

 TJ Tours in gallipoli

 

Where to stay:
Eceabat is the closest town to the Gallipoli sites
We chose to stay at Hotel Casa Villa, a very clean B&B close to the town.
Book Hotel Casa Villa here

Though it was fully booked when we wanted to visit, my first choice would be The Gallipoli Houses which is in a small village between Eceabat and Gallipoli.

 

Where to Eat:
Liman Restaurant
Istiklal Caddesi 67, Eceabat
Excellent seafood

 

Other articles you may enjoy:
An Introduction to Istanbul for the First Time Visitor
Your Guide to Istanbul: What to do
Istanbul’s Aya Sofia Museum

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A Taste of Rottnest Island: Crayfish

The heady days of summer are over for another year and so is our time at Rottnest Island. We spend most of the summer here, hiding away in our old wooden boat in one of the northern bays on the island. It’s a relaxing lifestyle. One where every day starts catching crayfish!

A Taste of Rottnest Island: Crayfish

Our summer getaway!

 

It’s one of the most important tasks of the day…to check the cray pots and see if we’re having fresh crayfish or western rock lobster as they’re officially known, for dinner.

A Taste of Rottnest Island: Crayfish

A good size crayfish

 

How to catch crayfish

Our crays are caught in pots. Today they are mainly plastic but there are still a few wooden ones around and even the odd cane pot. The pots are baited…we use fish heads…and then the important task of looking for a place to drop the pots commences.

A Taste of Rottnest Island: Crayfish

Fish heads in the craypot bait box

 

Most of the time the water is fairly clear. This helps when you are looking for that tiny hole, preferably with a sandy bottom and surrounded by rock, to put the craypot.

The crayfish love to hide in these rocks and hopefully the lure of the fish heads will bring them to investigate the pots…and fall down the hole at the top of the pot! Sometimes an octopus will visit making the most of a ready caught meal.

The next day you go back to pull the pot. Hopefully the flutter of the crayfish can be heard as the pot is pulled into the boat.

A Taste of Rottnest Island: Crayfish

I can see a few crayfish in this pot!

 

Once the crays are removed from the pot, the bait is replaced if needed and the pot put back into the water. The process starts again.

You can also dive for crayfish and catch them either using your bare hands or with a hand held snare which is not as easy as it sounds!

A license is required

In our part of the state, the cray season opens on October 15 and closes on June 15. You must obtain a license to catch crayfish….for each license, you are allowed two craypots. You are allowed to catch and hold eight crayfish per day per license.

A Taste of Rottnest Island: Crayfish

Crayfish in the holding pot

 

The carapace must be of a minimum length (76mm) and females with eggs are not allowed to be taken. Any crayfish that are too small or have tar spots (eggs) are thrown back into the water.

A Taste of Rottnest Island: Crayfish

Those orange spots are crayfish eggs

 

If they pass these criteria, they must then have their one of their tail flaps cut so they cannot be sold. This way the local cray fishing industry is protected.

A Taste of Rottnest Island: Crayfish

Just out of the pot!

 

 A Taste of Rottnest Island: Crayfish

Freshly caught crayfish

How to cook crayfish

The time then comes to cook the crayfish. Every boat owner has their own recipe. Some steam them, others microwave whilst others like my husband, prefer to boil them. They are drowned in fresh water before being popped into the boiling water together with a little sugar and vinegar. A slurp of beer is optional! Crayfish change colour to a bright red when they are cooked.

 

A Taste of Rottnest Island: Crayfish

Cooking the crayfish

 

A Taste of Rottnest Island: Crayfish

Just out of the pot!

 

A Taste of Rottnest Island: Crayfish

Cooked crayfish

 

There’s nothing better that eating slightly warm crayfish that were swimming a few hours earlier….definitely a taste of Rottnest.

A Taste of Rottnest Island: Crayfish

Freshly cooked cray tails

 

We also like to have them grilled on the barbequeue….

 

 A Taste of Rottnest Island: Crayfish

Just add some garlic butter to crayfish on the grill!

 

 

or with pasta and a bit of chilli and garlic!

A Taste of Rottnest Island: Crayfish

Crayfish Pasta

 

But the best way to eat them is in a fresh cray sandwich!
Fresh bread is a must and the Rottnest bakery makes fabulous bread! Just add lemon, a touch of wasabi or my favourite, mango mayonnaise.

A Taste of Rottnest Island: Crayfish

Cray sando!

 

Oh for the long, hot endless days of summer!

 

How would you like to eat crayfish or lobster?

 

Other articles you may enjoy:
Our Summer Getaway: Rottnest Island
Everyone loves Quokkas
The Rottnest Channel Swim

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38

4 of the Best Beaches on Vis

One of the attractions of staying on the Croatian island of Vis is its fabulous beaches.

Vis is my favourite island in Croatia. An island surrounded by some the clearest blue water you’ll find in the Adriatic. The main beaches are on the southern side of the island….a coastline of protected bays and secluded coves offering some of the best beaches on the island.

Most of the beaches can be reached by car but the best way to see them is by boat.
Boats are available for rent if you have a skipper’s ticket or boat license or you can book the services of a boat and skipper for the day. Otherwise cars, scooters and bicycles are available for hire on the island.

The best beaches on Vis:

Grandovac Beach

Grandovac is the closest beach to the village of Kut. It is an easy twenty minute walk on a flat path that takes you along the waterfront, past some of the old stone homes in the village and then past newer homes that have been built since the island allowed people to return. Towards the end of the walk, you will see the old abandoned Czech Villa, once a glorious building but now completely ruined inside. Don’t forget to look at the street art on the abandoned building on the right just before the villa.

Best Beaches on Vis

Grandovac has crystal clear water and a small stone beach. It is protected from the breeze and the tamarisk and pine trees overlooking it, offer some shade. Under the trees is a small bar where it is very easy to while away a few hours before heading back to town.

 

Best Beaches on Vis

Best Beaches on Vis

You can drive here if the walk seems too long or if you are coming from Komiza. Just follow the signs!

 

Stončica Beach

Stoncica is the first beach you will come to after leaving Vis. It’s about a fifteen to twenty minute drive from town. When you see cars parked along the side of road, park where you can and wander down the gravel path to the beach.

Best Beaches on Vis

If you’re arriving by boat, this large protected bay offers many quiet corners for anchorage.

This is one of the best beaches for kids as it is one of the few sandy beaches on the island. The sand slopes gently into the bay, and there’s plenty of shade available if you need it. There’s a restaurant, snack bar and even a volley ball court if you feel like getting a group together for a game.

Best Beaches on Vis

Best Beaches on Vis

 

Best Beaches on Vis

There is also a fabulous restaurant on the sand hidden behind the reeds. On your way to your table, you’ll pass the grill where the catch of the day is cooked. Sitting under the shade of the pine trees, feet in the sand, a glass of wine in hand and a delicious meal is the perfect way to spend an afternoon. At busy times bookings are recommended

Best Beaches on Vis

Best Beaches on Vis

 

Srebrna Beach

Another popular beach near the town of Rukavac is Srebrna Beach. Choose the path you take from the parking area to the beach carefully. Take the fork to the left if you’d like to join those who love wearing their natural bathing suits at Bilbok Beach. The path directly in front of you takes you to Srebrna, a stunning bay that is perfect for families.

Best Beaches on Vis

Over the rock ledge on the right is another more secluded bay with water just as clear but a shade darker. The narrow path from the rocks to this bay winds through low bushes and dense scrub.

Best Beaches on Vis

 

Best Beaches on Vis

 

 

Stiniva Beach

I’m sure you’ve all seen photos of Stiniva Bay…..

Best Beaches on Vis

Best Beaches on Vis

You know the one….a tiny stone beach with lapping clear blue blue water beckons through the gap in the high rocks. Gingerly you poke the nose of the runaboat in and hope that there are not too many boats inside. It’s ok, the local taxi boat from Rukovac is there, dropping off the day trippers but the rest of the bay is fairly empty.

Best Beaches on Vis

On another occasion we arrived by car and walk down to the beach…..probably not one of our smarter moves! The path down the cliff is steep, very steep…it’s not for everyone.

Best Beaches on Vis

 

Best Beaches on Vis

It’s rocky and took us about 30 mins to arrive on the beach. Thankfully there’s a bar in the corner of the beach. After cold drinks and a just edible panini it was time for a swim before tackling the uphill walk. This takes a bit longer…my legs were still shaking from the descent but finally we made it to the top. Actually it’s not that bad, we just have age and lack of fitness against us!

Best Beaches on Vis

It’s definitely one of the best beaches to see…but choose how you get there carefully!

 

There are many other beaches on the island.

If you’re looking for a sandy beach suitable for children, then Milna Beach is another option. The beach is flat and shallow and is also close to the road so it’s easy to access.
About a fifteen minute walk from here is Zaglav Beach, one that we didn’t get to see but by all reports it is very popular.

Best Beaches on Vis

In walking distance from Vis town Privolo Beach. Further afield on the northern side of the island near Fort George are two rocky ledge ‘beaches’ frequented mainly by nudists.
If you are staying in Komiza, the small, stoney and popular Kamenica Beach is within walking distance of the town. 

Best Beaches on Vis

Infact there are too many beaches to mention. Just find a little bay and lay down your towel. The water will be sublime, the rocks warm and hopefully you will have it to yourself!

Which beach would you like to visit?

 

Your Guide to Vis is a series of four posts on the island
Vis: The Best Island in Croatia has already been published
To come: Where to Eat on Vis and What to do on the Island of Vis
Other articles on Croatia that you may enjoy:
Seven Weeks in Croatia: The Highlights
Skradin: Gateway to Krka National Park
Sunset in Zadar
The Croatian Island of Cres

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Vis: The Best Island in Croatia.

With over seven hundred islands in Croatia it’s hard to choose which islands to visit. According to Wikipedia, there’s only forty seven that are inhabited so that helps a bit!

Our favourite island in Croatia has retained it’s charm and resisted development. It has some of the best beaches in the country, has fabulous fresh seafood and local wines and imparts a feeling of laziness even though there is a lot to do. .

Sounds idyllic doesn’t it….and it is!
For us, the best island in Croatia is Vis. 

Vis: The Best Island in Croatia

Vis is the island that draws us back to Croatia.

It is the furthest island in the Adriatic from the Croatian coast hidden behind the islands of Hvar, Brac and Solta.
For many years it was the military and naval headquarters of Tito’s partisan army and was closed to the public until 1989. This meant that it escaped large commercial development and was able to retain its natural beauty.  The architecture on the island dates back to the early days of Venetians rule. Beautiful old stone buildings, made from stone from the nearby island of Brac, line narrow streets and alleyways in Vis and Komiza.

Vis: The Best Island in Croatia

 

The main towns on Vis

Vis (Luka)

Vis town is situated in a protected bay…Viska Luka… on the northern end of the island. At one end of the bay is the port of Vis (Luka), where the ferries from Split arrive. Cafes and bars that spill into the squares and along the waterfront, come to life at night.

Vis: The Best Island in Croatia Vis: The Best Island in Croatia

Vis: The Best Island in Croatia

 

The walk to the other end of the bay and the small village of Kut takes twenty minutes. The road runs along the waters edge providing glorious views of the bay.

Vis: The Best Island in Croatia

 

Vis: The Best Island in Croatia

 

Vis: The Best Island in Croatia

 

 

Vis: The Best Island in Croatia

 

Kut

Kut has a lovely feel about it…some of the town’s old stone buildings are built to the water’s edge whilst others surround the square. There’s a few bars in the square and a couple of restaurants along the waterfront but on the whole it is quieter at this end of the bay! Vis’ best restaurant, Pojoda, can be found in Kut.

Vis: The Best Island in Croatia

The village of Kut at sunset

 

Vis: The Best Island in Croatia

Yachts on the waterfront at Kut

 

Vis: The Best Island in Croatia

Kut

 

 

Komiza

Komiza on the western end of the island, is predominately a fishing village.
The village is a delight to wander around, fresh seafood graces the local restaurant’s menus and cafes and bars line the promenade. You can also take a boat from Komiza to visit the Blue Cave on Bisevo Island.

 

Vis: The Best Island in Croatia

Komiza

 

 

Vis: The Best Island in Croatia

Vis: The Best Island in Croatia

 

Vis has fabulous beaches

Vis has some of the best beaches in Croatia. The southern coast is dotted with beautiful bays and secluded coves. Most of the beaches are stone beaches but there are a few sand beaches on the island. Stoncica, Stiniva and Srebena are favourites. Granvalac which is in walking distance from Kut, is another. There will be more on these beaches next week.

 

Vis: The Best Island in Croatia

Stiniva Beach

 

 

Vis: The Best Island in Croatia

Vis: The Best Island in Croatia

Stoncica Beach

Vis: The Best Island in Croatia

Stunning clear blue water

Vis has great food and wine

It was not an easy time for the people on Vis during the years the island was closed. Many left to seek fame and fortune.  Those who remained were were either fisherman or involved in agriculture. Today these industries are flourishing and as a result there are some interesting wines and great food available.

Vis: The Best Island in Croatia

Lobster on the grill in Komiza

 

Vis: The Best Island in Croatia

Fabulous pizza at Karijola on Vis

 

 

Vis: The Best Island in Croatia

Fresh sardines

 

 

Vis: The Best Island in Croatia

Fresh fish at Pajoda

 

 

Local Wine

Driving through the centre of the island you will pass many vineyards. The Vugava grapes used to make white wine, were thought to have been bought to the island by the Romans whilst the red wine grape, the plavac, is a Croatian favourite. Olive groves also flourish and the olive oil from here is excellent.

Vis: The Best Island in Croatia

Vineyards in central Vis

 

Vis: The Best Island in Croatia

Local wine for sale

 

Vis: The Best Island in Croatia

White wine with a view

 

 

Many of the vineyards also offer delicious local cuisine. Cooking under the peka or bell is a Croatian speciality. You should definitely try this at least once whilst you are in Croatia. Lamb, beef or fish together with potatoes and other vegetables, are cooked for hours in a large pan over coals. Slow cooking at its best and the result is delicious.

Vis: The Best Island in Croatia

Cooking under the peka

 

How to get to Vis

Jadrolinija Ferries leave Split for Vis twice a day and take two and a half hours. The boats also take vehicles.
Krilo (Kapetan Luka) have a fast service from Split to Vis taking one and a half hours. They do not take cars. Last year they started operating a service on Tuesdays between Split, Hvar and Vis. This could be very handy if you are going between these islands and it would be worth arranging your itinerary around it but please check their latest schedule first.

 

Where to stay

There are only four hotels on the island. Of these the Hotel San Giorgio is the best.

Most people that go to Vis stay in one of the islands many apartments in either in Vis or in Komiza. These can easily be found the web. Personally I love to stay in the Kut end of Vis town.

Vis: The Best Island in Croatia

Villa Vis

 

Villa Vis Croatia

We stayed at the Villa Vis Croatia, a four room B&B in a fabulous position in Kut whose room rates range from 80E in low season to 125E in high season based on a three night stay. There is no lift. Access to the rooms is via a small spiral staircase. I recommend the green room which has it’s own entrance. Tatjana is a fabulous hostess and knows everything there is to know about Vis and can help you decide where to eat and what to do.

 

Coming up in the next few weeks: 
The Best Beaches on Vis
Where to Eat on Vis
What to do on Vis

 

Have you been to Vis?  Did you enjoy your stay there? I’d love to hear which island you consider the best island in Croatia

 

 

Other articles on Croatia that you may enjoy:
Seven Weeks in Croatia: The Highlights
Skradin: Gateway to Croatia’s Krka National Park
A.Ston.ishing Oysters in Croatia
The Croatian Island of Cres

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Sculpture by the Sea comes to Cottesloe Beach!

Sculpture by the Sea is a favourite event on the Perth art calendar. For two weeks in March, sculptors from all over the world take over Cottesloe Beach to exhibit their art. It is a popular exhibition with increasingly large crowds coming to view the sculptures. Special programmes are organised for the school children who come to be initiated into the world of sculpture.

Sculpture by the Sea, Cottesloe 2015

The last time I was in Perth for Sculpture by the Sea was in 2013 so it was lovely to be back wandering amongst the sculptures and enjoying the views. There have been a few changes. There are still many traditional sculptures admired for their artistic value but today it is the whimsical pieces that amuse and become the exhibitions talking points.

Some of the artists have become firm favourites with the West Australian public. Artists such as Chen Wenling return year after year.

Sculpture by the Sea, Cottesloe 2015

Chen Wenling…harbour

 

Sculpture by the Sea, Cottesloe 2015

Sculpture by the Sea Awards

The $10,000 West Australian Sculptor Scholarship was this year shared by Norton Flavel and Kim Perrier.

“Together the two winners of the WA Sculptor’s scholarship are a contrast in approaches: whereas Flavel’s sculpture is shiny and open, Perrier’s is dusky and closed. What both sculptor’s share is a consummate understanding of the expressive transformation of materials.” – Dr Michael Hill, Head of Art History & Theory, National Art School

Sculpture by the Sea, Cottesloe 2015

Norton Flavel…. the lucky country

 

Sculpture by the Sea, Cottesloe 2015

Kim Perrier….ashes to ashes

 

The awards for the Peoples Choice Prize and the Kids Choice Prize will be announced the day before the exhibition closes on March 23rd.

 

Sculpture by the Sea Exhibitors

Other exhibitors in this years Sculpture by the Sea include…..

Sculpture by the Sea, Cottesloe 2015

Naidee Changmoh…. the ascetic

 

Sculpture by the Sea, Cottesloe 2015

David Černy….babies three pieces

 

Sculpture by the Sea, Cottesloe 2015

Keid Moseholm…is this a step forward

 

Sculpture by the Sea, Cottesloe 2015

Benjmin Storch…constellation

 

Sculpture by the Sea, Cottesloe 2015

Brad Jackson ….wanders conventus

 

Sculpture by the Sea, Cottesloe 2015

Warlukurlangu Artists…..water dreaming

 

Sculpture by the Sea, Cottesloe 2015

Ken Unsworth AM…..my home is your home

 

Sculpture by the Sea, Cottesloe 2015

Neon…house of mirrors

 

Sculpture by the Sea, Cottesloe 2015

The view from inside Neon’s house of mirrors.

 

Sculpture by the Sea, Cottesloe 2015

Ayad Alqaragholli…hearts in paradise

 

Sculpture by the Sea, Cottesloe 2015

Kevin Draper….penelope 2015

 

Sculpture by the Sea, Cottesloe 2015

Yuko Takahashi….. way of the wind 2015

 

Sculpture by the Sea, Cottesloe 2015

Annette Thas…dame cockatoo and entourage

 

One of my favourites….

Sculpture by the Sea, Cottesloe 2015

Wendi Zhang….mi no 5

 

Sculpture by the Sea, Cottesloe 2015

Close up of Wendi Zhang’s red mesh flamingoes

 

Sculpture by the Sea, Cottesloe 2015

Russell Sheridan…..sisters

 

This is the first year that an underwater sculpture has been shown….

Sculpture by the Sea, Cottesloe 2015

Olivia Samec and James Moe…sanctuary

 

Sculpture by the Sea, Cottesloe 2015

Stormie Mills…..the #stormie millsproject

 

Sculpture by the Sea, Cottesloe 2015

Ray Surman…food for thought

 

Sculpture by the Sea, Cottesloe 2015

Jimmy Rix,….roo shooter

 

Sculpture by the Sea, Cottesloe 2015

The view from the Surf Club where smaller sculptures are on display

 

Which is your favourite sculpture? 

 

Articles you may enjoy:
The Cloisters: A Hidden Museum in New York
The Golden Mosaics of Monreale Cathedral
The Beauty of Melbourne’s Notorious Weather
Sculpture by the Sea

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